How to deal with EHX power supplies in pedalboards?
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Posted: 07 December 2017 12:23 AM

Unlike other of my pedals, my EHXs all create signal noise when plugged into my pedal power or other multi-adapter units, which I’m guessing is because EHX troublesomely uses 9.6 instead of standard 9v adapters.

Has anyone found a solution for this? I want to use several EHX pedals alongside my other pedals, but I don’t want to have to plug in separate 9.6v adapters for each EHX.

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Posted: 07 December 2017 03:31 AM | Link to this reply (#1)

I haven’t found EHX effects to be particularly noisy compared to other effects. And I don’t think the voltage of the EHX adaptors has anything to do with it. The adapter might be 9.6 volts, but the effect will draw whatever it needs. Batteries vary in voltage over their life. Effects are designed to operate within a range of voltages. The reason you don’t get noise when you use their dedicated adaptors is because they are isolated. They are also isolated when you use batteries In fact, batteries is THE BEST way to isolate your effects, but it is a hassle. The better the isolation in your multi-effect power unit, the less noisy all of the effects will be. I have noticed that effects from the same manufacturer tend to play well with each other. Let’s say you have just DOD and EHX and nothing else. You MIGHT get better results having all of your DOD on one power supply and all of your EHX on another power supply.

You should test adding your effects one at a time to the power supply chain and see when you start getting noise. In my case, I noticed it was when I added a particular non-EHX effect to my mostly EHX effects chain.

Which power supply are you using? Which effects? What is the order? Have you tested with batteries vs. power supply to try to find the culprit?

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Posted: 07 December 2017 03:38 AM | Link to this reply (#2)

It’s the EHX pedals. I have a dozen pedals of all types, 9 and 12vs, and I can plug them all in using my pedal power-style adapters, and there is no signal noise (of course you get extra sound from the pedals in some cases, but this is just increased in white noise, or swirling if you have a flanger or phaser turned on or something. Totally different thing, and you can turn it off by turning the pedal off. Then when you plug in any of my EHX pedals, you get a whirling electronic pattern (kind of a highpitched current-y sound), which you can’t remove.

I don’t think I’m the only one dealing with this, as the guy at my local music shop seemed familiar with the EHX pedal noise problem as well. And it’s clearly demonstrable with any of my multi-power bars.

I suspect it’s because EHX uses the 9.6, but it could be some other issue with them as well.

Hopefully someone will have figured something out.

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Posted: 07 December 2017 11:52 AM | Link to this reply (#3)

Your noise is created because you are using a power supply that does not have isolated outputs.
CPU noise and hash then enters the signal chain. Cheap multi supplies are famous for non isolated outputs.
If you need to use such a supply the fix is an isolator adapter

With multi supplies you have to be careful as often the outputs are not isolated. That can cause noise between digital pedals. If that happens you need to use the original supply on the pedal with noise OR get a isolator plug like the one made by Diago PS-09
We are working hard to now build our pedals to work with these cheap supplies. here is the Diago plug
https://reverb.com/item/1678744-diago-ps-09-isolator-adaptor-clean-up-your-sound-free-shipping

ex

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NweK7wVh_LQ

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=23nEsQ2CeuU

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