Any tips for cleaning up the sound of an original hog?
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Posted: 07 June 2017 11:34 PM

I bought my HOG years ago, long before the HOG2, and B9 series came out and I recently had a chance to play a B9 organ machine at a music store, and loved the sounds I was getting, especially with some jazzier chords.

The B9 seemed to track pretty well, and while the HOG is great, a sore spot for me is when I try to get an organ-like tone and play more complex jazz chords they don’t track terribly well and seem to get muddied up with background noise.

Anyone have any tips on getting the HOG to track complex chords better? Or filtering out some of the noise to get closer to a B9 type sound?

Edited: 11 June 2017 03:14 AM by coolbeans
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Posted: 04 July 2017 03:23 PM | Link to this reply (#1)

So I’ve spent some time fiddling with my HOG a little more, here are some tips I’ve found if anyone else is curious.
Keep in mind this info mainly relates to getting a B3 Organ type sound out of the HOG and using it for JAZZ CHORDS. Overall I’ve found the HOG tracks individual notes and basic major and minor chords superbly.

1. Be careful with the upper octaves and higher voicings, dialing them in too much can get quite noisy.

2. The envelope filter is your friend, especially for upper octaves. increasing the decay time on them can help clean up some of the higher pitched background noise quite nicely.

3. Avoid the spectral gate. This one kind of surprised me, as I had seen Bill Rupert’s old effectology video on the B3 organ sound in which he recommended using the spectral gate to get a more organ like tone. I’ve personally found the spectral gate to simply add too much background noise when playing jazz chords.

4. Chorus/modulation effects after the hog help to hide some of the noise which it sometimes generates. I REALLY want to get a Lester G because I know it would sound amazing with the HOG. Time to save up some money smile

5. Messing with the filter can also help. Putting the filter slider all the way up and resonance all the way down is a good starting point.


I almost caved and bought a B9 organ machine, but overall I’m glad I didn’t, because after some thoughtful fiddling I was pretty satisfied with what I got, and I think once I get a nice Leslie simulator the hog is gonna sound amazing! That seems to be the main thing it’s missing when I compare the sound of my hog to the sound of the B9 in videos, that nice rotary speaker sound. I mean hey Ive been loving the B9 series but if I can manage to get that sound with a pedal I already own my wallet will thank me smile

Edited: 04 July 2017 03:30 PM by coolbeans
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Posted: 11 August 2017 07:09 PM | Link to this reply (#2)

Another thing you can do will help. One of the electronic techs at my job told me the sliders are not well protected from dust. Open the HOG, get your gas canister & clean it up. Big difference in noise. Just be careful not to touch anything inside the unit, it’s a digital gadget & some of those bits & pieces are ESD sensitive.

Mark Showalter
Gainesville, Fl
myspace.com/folkstone57

The difference between great music & just noise is silence.

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