B9 ORGAN TIPS NEEDED
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Posted: 07 April 2015 10:57 AM

Could someone give me some tip/suggestions on playing the b9 as a rhythm guitar in Pat Benetars “love is a battlefield”? I’m in a cover band and we have been doing this song and I am trying to incorporate the b9 into the song, but having a little trouble getting the sound right. excuse my ignorance, but should I be playing full chords or just pulling a few notes out of the chords? Play with a pick or not? It sounds fine most of the song but is very touchy if I strum or hit one string to hard, it will ring out loudly. any help would be greatly appreciated!

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Posted: 09 April 2015 01:08 PM | Link to this reply (#1)

If nothing else you might try a compressor/limiter after the B9 as that should control most artifacts and transients.

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Posted: 03 May 2017 07:03 PM | Link to this reply (#2)

I think chords tend to muddy the water, single notes is the way to go.  A freeze pedal could be used to freeze a specific note /polytone while you play other notes over the top.  This gives you the feel of playing an organ with two hands.  One hand holding the chord while playing fills over the chord with the other hand.

My feelings on the organ pedal is you have to get a leslie type rotary speaker sound behind it to get a true organ sound.  The Lester G pedal behind the B9 might be what you are looking for..

Edited: 03 May 2017 07:09 PM by mandoloonie
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Posted: 18 May 2017 06:27 PM | Link to this reply (#3)

It handles chords great and it has a built in leslie.
Its best to put a compressor after the B9 unless your playing is very even.
We built that into the synth9.

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