Effectology, Vol. 4: Hammond B-3 Organ
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Posted: 14 July 2009 10:00 AM

http://www.ehx.com/blog/effectology-hammond-b3-organ

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Posted: 14 July 2009 10:07 AM | Link to this reply (#1)

Hi everyone,

The first time I played the HOG I was amazed at how close some of the functions were to an actual Hammond organ. So much so, I am surprised the name HOG did not stand for Hammond-Organ-Generator!

The different sliders on the HOG closely resemble the look and functions of the sliding drawbars of a Hammond B-3. Below is a representation of the B-3 drawbars. Compare them to the HOG sliders and you will see just how close they really are.

The next Hammond related feature I found was the envelope section. This brilliant design allows the unit to mimic the percussion feature of the B-3. 

Here’s a little background on the B-3 percussion.

A distinctive sound of the Hammond is the harmonic percussion effect. The term “percussion” does not refer to a drum-type sound effect. Instead, it refers to the addition of the second and third harmonic overtones, which can be added independently to the attack envelope of a note. The selected percussion harmonic(s) then quickly fade out, creating a distinctive “plink” sound and leaving the tones which the player has selected using the drawbars. The percussion retriggers only after all notes have been released, so legato passages only have a percussion on the first note. Older Hammond models produced before the 3 series organs (such as the B-2 and C-2) do not have the harmonic percussion feature.

Below is the HOG setting I used for this clip. The second half of the clip has the spectral gate switch on to produce a more pure jazz organ sound.

To increase the sustain of the guitar I used a compressor in front of the HOG.
This allowed me to hold on to chords and notes longer like the endless sustain of the Hammond organ.

A rotary speaker, Leslie amp or Leslie emulator can be used for added realism.

Below are several different EHX pedals and settings which produce a great rotary effect on their own. If you have one of the pedals give it a try.


Thanks for listening,
Bill Ruppert

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Posted: 14 July 2009 12:36 PM | Link to this reply (#2)

I’m a big fan of vibrato mode on the Clone Theory set shallow and fast for rotary sounds.

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Posted: 14 July 2009 01:50 PM | Link to this reply (#3)

Bill, you are a genius !!  I love your work, very inspiring

http://www.brianabbott.info
The Invisible Opera Company of Tibet

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Posted: 14 July 2009 03:32 PM | Link to this reply (#4)

Great vid and a very interesting read, Bill! Keep ‘em coming!

Fender and Spector basses, Gallien-Krueger amps, SWR cabs, and pedals, oh god the pedals!

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Posted: 15 July 2009 10:03 PM | Link to this reply (#5)

I may be a while before I can justify the cost of a HOG, but if EHX made a little box with just an input, output, bypass switch, and this sound hard-wired, I wouldn’t be able to resist it.

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Posted: 03 September 2009 07:06 AM | Link to this reply (#6)

Hi !
Is it possible to use the HOG with a bass, using this Hammond B3 settings ?
I’m wondering how a bass may sounds ...
:love:

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Posted: 03 September 2009 12:53 PM | Link to this reply (#7)

Sure it would sound great.
Playing in the upper range with two note chord would be very cool.
You could also use the HOG to shift your entire bass up one octave as well by using the octave bend feature.
Bill Ruppert

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Posted: 30 October 2009 01:29 PM | Link to this reply (#8)

Sounds awesome! I love the Effectology series.

Would it possible to do a episode emulating a normal piano sound? I would love to be able to do some piano bits on my guitar…

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Posted: 30 October 2009 04:03 PM | Link to this reply (#9)
Bill Ruppert - 14 July 2009 03:07 PM

Hi everyone,

The first time I played the HOG I was amazed at how close some of the functions were to an actual Hammond organ. So much so, I am surprised the name HOG did not stand for Hammond-Organ-Generator!

The different sliders on the HOG closely resemble the look and functions of the sliding drawbars of a Hammond B-3. Below is a representation of the B-3 drawbars. Compare them to the HOG sliders and you will see just how close they really are.

The next Hammond related feature I found was the envelope section. This brilliant design allows the unit to mimic the percussion feature of the B-3. 

Here’s a little background on the B-3 percussion.

A distinctive sound of the Hammond is the harmonic percussion effect. The term “percussion” does not refer to a drum-type sound effect. Instead, it refers to the addition of the second and third harmonic overtones, which can be added independently to the attack envelope of a note. The selected percussion harmonic(s) then quickly fade out, creating a distinctive “plink” sound and leaving the tones which the player has selected using the drawbars. The percussion retriggers only after all notes have been released, so legato passages only have a percussion on the first note. Older Hammond models produced before the 3 series organs (such as the B-2 and C-2) do not have the harmonic percussion feature.

Below is the HOG setting I used for this clip. The second half of the clip has the spectral gate switch on to produce a more pure jazz organ sound.

To increase the sustain of the guitar I used a compressor in front of the HOG.
This allowed me to hold on to chords and notes longer like the endless sustain of the Hammond organ.

A rotary speaker, Leslie amp or Leslie emulator can be used for added realism.

Below are several different EHX pedals and settings which produce a great rotary effect on their own. If you have one of the pedals give it a try.


Thanks for listening,
Bill Ruppert

can someone do one of these for the #8 stawberry fields sound

Look out for the least known record label in the 203
noisyrecords.bandcamp.com

PEDAL BOARD SO FAR

vox wah
gmd luther drive
ehx bass big muff
ehx holy grail
ehx memory toy


Gear TO GO

devi ever vintage fuzz master
arc effects big green pi (to replace bass big muff)
ehx small clone

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Posted: 30 October 2009 04:49 PM | Link to this reply (#10)

The Strawberry Fields Flute sound is here:

http://www.ehx.com/forums/viewthread/1695/

Bill Ruppert

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Posted: 30 October 2009 04:51 PM | Link to this reply (#11)
azrael - 30 October 2009 06:29 PM

Sounds awesome! I love the Effectology series.

Would it possible to do a episode emulating a normal piano sound? I would love to be able to do some piano bits on my guitar…

You never know.
A acoustic piano would be very hard to do.
Bill

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Posted: 31 October 2009 04:33 AM | Link to this reply (#12)
Bill Ruppert - 30 October 2009 09:51 PM
azrael - 30 October 2009 06:29 PM

Sounds awesome! I love the Effectology series.

Would it possible to do a episode emulating a normal piano sound? I would love to be able to do some piano bits on my guitar…

You never know.
A acoustic piano would be very hard to do.
Bill

If you play something to the tempo (rate) of the (Stereo-) PULSAR,
you can use certain settings which can remind of the plucking attack of
a piano or banjo…

SHAPE-switch: triangle (ramp)
SHAPE-knob: almost maxed out clockwise
DEPTH-knob: full depth (~2 o`clock)
RATE-knob: adjust to whatever you want to play…

some (resonant) filter after the Pulsar may help on the “tone”,
as well as maybe a Frequency Analyzer or Octave Multiplexer
for a little metallic “ringing” before or after the Pulsar can
add to more “reality”...


[with the Shape-knob turned to the other extreme,
some bowed-string-like slow attack can be achieved…]

p.s.: I might have mixed up the 2 extreme settings,
which might just be the other way `round,
but you`ll easy find out which is which…

Most Of All… We Need The FUNK

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Posted: 31 October 2009 02:33 PM | Link to this reply (#13)

i can’t believe i never got around to watching this until now.

Intoxicated with the madness, I’m in love with my sadness

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Posted: 15 April 2012 01:00 AM | Link to this reply (#14)

I used I big muff (with the tone set from 9 to noon) before the HOG and a DMM set to chorus after and got a great dirty tonewheel sound.

MattInVegas plays through …

Hum Debugger > Soul Preacher > Big Muff Pi > Freeze > HOG > Small Stone > Deluxe Memory Man > 2880

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Posted: 10 May 2012 05:49 PM | Link to this reply (#15)

OK, Hammond Heaven now looks like this:

Big Muff >> Freeze >> HOG >> DMM >> Small Stone

I added the dry signal to the HOG and got a great Jon Lord Deep Purple sound, although it sounds better with the BigMuff and DMM off when you add the dry.

MattInVegas plays through …

Hum Debugger > Soul Preacher > Big Muff Pi > Freeze > HOG > Small Stone > Deluxe Memory Man > 2880

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